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How does black magic work to ruin someone? You are now viewing the How does black magic work to ruin someone? thread.
  1. #1 August 18th, 2012

    Default How does black magic work to ruin someone?

    I wonder how does black magic can put hurdles in the way of someone to progress or sometimes they even get killed? Can any give me a scientific explanation? Thanks

  2. #2 August 18th, 2012
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    You've posted a great question but in the wrong sub-forum. This clearly belongs in the coin magic section.

    Jason

  3. #3 August 18th, 2012

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    Haha Jason, nice one. Anyways, you can't give a scientific explanation for magic, they're opposites.

    The below statement is true.
    The above statement is false.
  4. #4 August 18th, 2012

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    Real magic or black magic doesn't exist. Watch Sherlock Holmes (The first movie, not "Game of shadows") and you will understand. Actually, I liked that movie 10 times more because I'm a magician.

    EDIT: I really recommend this movie to anyone who didn't watch it. It is so good.

  5. #5 August 18th, 2012

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    Ady01, in some parts of the world black magic is still believed and feared. A wedding I was hired for a while ago was for an African bride and a lot of her family were there in tradition dress. She married a white guy so there was a mixed audience. Some of the African people genuinely believed I had powers and at points, dragged the kids away saying "No! You don't want to see that".

    The only way you can really get around it is by exposing the secret to show them that there is a method behind it and you're not accomplishing it by some divine power.

  6. #6 August 18th, 2012

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ady01 View Post
    Real magic or black magic doesn't exist. Watch Sherlock Holmes (The first movie, not "Game of shadows") and you will understand.
    Without wanting to be overly harsh, I don't think taking a Guy Ritchie film as some kind of educational resource is a sensible idea. You can't even learn about Sherlock Holmes from watching Sherlock Holmes.

    Depending on how you define it, "black magic" could certainly be seen as real. As I understand it, "magick" (by which I mean "real" magic, as opposed to tricks), is a systematized way to use your intention to affect the world around you. Black magick is that process, using your intentions to impede, rather than assist, others. So, the question of whether black magick is real comes down to this: Is it possible to impede the intentions of others simply with your own intentions. I would contend that yes it is.

    I've just been reading Richard Wiseman's book Paranormality. He discusses a study where a teacher was told that certain students in her class showed signs of being "bloomers", i.e. performing better than others of their age. When the next round of tests happened at the end of the school year, these "bloomers" performed around 15% better than their classmates, thus proving the original assessment. The one sticking point is that these students had been selected at random. This study demonstrates that a belief can manifest in the real world in a way which could be called "white magick", since it helped these so-called bloomers to perform better. The flip-side of that, of course, is that if belief can help random students perform better, the opposite is also true, so people can be negatively affected by belief and intention.

    Whether you choose to classify that as magick is up to you, but it's certainly within the word's definition.

  7. #7 August 18th, 2012

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    Quote Originally Posted by TeeDee View Post
    Without wanting to be overly harsh, I don't think taking a Guy Ritchie film as some kind of educational resource is a sensible idea. You can't even learn about Sherlock Holmes from watching Sherlock Holmes.

    Depending on how you define it, "black magic" could certainly be seen as real. As I understand it, "magick" (by which I mean "real" magic, as opposed to tricks), is a systematized way to use your intention to affect the world around you. Black magick is that process, using your intentions to impede, rather than assist, others. So, the question of whether black magick is real comes down to this: Is it possible to impede the intentions of others simply with your own intentions. I would contend that yes it is.

    I've just been reading Richard Wiseman's book Paranormality. He discusses a study where a teacher was told that certain students in her class showed signs of being "bloomers", i.e. performing better than others of their age. When the next round of tests happened at the end of the school year, these "bloomers" performed around 15% better than their classmates, thus proving the original assessment. The one sticking point is that these students had been selected at random. This study demonstrates that a belief can manifest in the real world in a way which could be called "white magick", since it helped these so-called bloomers to perform better. The flip-side of that, of course, is that if belief can help random students perform better, the opposite is also true, so people can be negatively affected by belief and intention.

    Whether you choose to classify that as magick is up to you, but it's certainly within the word's definition.
    I personally believe that the power of human mind can affect certain things only by thinking about them ( I didn't exactly express myself the way I wanted ), but not anyone can accomplish such things. Many people have weak minds. About that story with the bloomers. It doesn't prove anything. When I first started 9th grade 2 years ago, I had a group of girls in my class which told all our teachers that their friend ( let's call her girl "x" ) was the best in her class from 1st to 8th grade. It happens that I was her collegue too from the beginning. She was no bloomer. She was an ordinary girl that had stupid friends. Since then, she always gets better marks than us, just because the teacher gives her better marks. We always compare our tests with her's and they are equal if not better.

    EDIT: Does it matter if it's a Guy Ritchie film?? I also don't want to be harsh, but I hate it when people see a movie title and say "oh god it's directed by X or it has X actor in it. I'm not watching that thing." WHY?? Different movies have different scenarios and actors behave differently. It is a very good movie in my oppinion.

  8. #8 August 18th, 2012

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ady01 View Post
    I personally believe that the power of human mind can affect certain things only by thinking about them ( I didn't exactly express myself the way I wanted ), but not anyone can accomplish such things. Many people have weak minds. About that story with the bloomers. It doesn't prove anything. When I first started 9th grade 2 years ago, I had a group of girls in my class which told all our teachers that their friend ( let's call her girl "x" ) was the best in her class from 1st to 8th grade. It happens that I was her collegue too from the beginning. She was no bloomer. She was an ordinary girl that had stupid friends. Since then, she always gets better marks than us, just because the teacher gives her better marks. We always compare our tests with her's and they are equal if not better.

    EDIT: Does it matter if it's a Guy Ritchie film?? I also don't want to be harsh, but I hate it when people see a movie title and say "oh god it's directed by X or it has X actor in it. I'm not watching that thing." WHY?? Different movies have different scenarios and actors behave differently. It is a very good movie in my oppinion.
    Your story is a bit different from the study I mentioned. You're talking about one person who consistently out-performed their group of friends. I'm talking about a group of randomly selected students who, to a statistically significant degree, out-performed their classmates simply by dint of their teacher's perception of them and the behaviours that engendered.

    As to your assertion that "not anyone can accomplish such things", I'd refer you to The Cambridge Handbook of Expertise and Expert Performance. People who are "expert" (i.e. can accomplish things that others can't), do not possess any special qualities that mark them out from the rest of the population. They just worked harder.

    Oh, and for the record, I quite liked both of Guy Ritchie's Sherlock Holmes films. It's just I don't think any of his output could be usefully classed as educational or instructive.

  9. #9 August 18th, 2012

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    I didn't say these films should be classed as educational or instructive. I just wanted to give an example of how "black magic" works in most cases. About that study you mentioned, I think it is the same case as in my story. The teacher is told that one or more students are bloomers and he gives better grades to those stundets. A study made using humans isn't always accurate. If they really wanted to prove somthing they should've used a machine to grade the tests, but then who would receive the information about the students being bloomers?? It is in most teachers' nature to blindly give better grades to stundents who they think are better.

  10. #10 August 18th, 2012

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ady01 View Post
    I didn't say these films should be classed as educational or instructive. I just wanted to give an example of how "black magic" works in most cases. About that study you mentioned, I think it is the same case as in my story. The teacher is told that one or more students are bloomers and he gives better grades to those stundets. A study made using humans isn't always accurate. If they really wanted to prove somthing they should've used a machine to grade the tests, but then who would receive the information about the students being bloomers?? It is in most teachers' nature to blindly give better grades to stundents who they think are better.
    Sorry, I wasn't clear enough on the nature of the study. The tests were standardized intelligence tests administered by the psychologist who ran the study so their was no room for teacher bias in grading. The effect of expectation on performance has become known as "the Pygmalion Effect", and this full study is written up in Pygmalion in the Classroom by R Rosenthal and L Jacobson.

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